Secure Web Traffic

In recent months you may have noticed some new warnings showing up in your web browser’s address bar saying “Not Secure”. If you haven’t noticed this yet, chances are you will from October 2017 when a change will mean that this will come up more often.

YOUR CONNECTION IS NOT SECURE

This type of warning was showing up so frequently for visitors of Oil and Gas International’s website that its developer logged a complaint with Mozilla (the creator of Firefox) asking to have it removed from their customer’s browsers.

 

According to the complaint the warnings caused “concern by our subscribers and is detrimental to our business”. What they failed to identify, however, was that the warning pointed to bigger issues with the security of Oil and Gas International’s website.

WHAT'S CHANGED?

Website developers and owners are still building highly valued online experiences for their clients. But while more and more businesses have moved online, hackers and other cyber criminals have also increasingly begun to target visitors to these websites for less than legitimate purposes.

Website security warnings in Google Chrome

Website security warnings in Google Chrome

In late 2016, Google announced that throughout 2017 they would start to move towards a more secure web by gradually introducing notifications in Chrome stating “Not Secure” where websites were putting visitor data at risk. Initially, this was only appearing for sites asking for passwords and credit card details insecurely, but from October this will start to show up on all websites asking for visitors to submit data without an SSL certificate. If your website has a contact form, search option or any other space for visitors to send you information this will impact how your website visitors see your business.

The ways we protect data when it's transferred can be tough to wrap your head around, but as this is becoming increasingly important for all businesses we've created a security pathway designed to help. In the pathway, we’ll help you understand what an SSL certificate is, whether you need one (hint: you do) and guide you on how to make sure your business is using them to keep your data safe as it travels over the web.

Adam Selwood